Noise pollution affects both stress hormones and fitness of birds

The latest study found that there is a huge effect of constant noise pollution on birds.  According to new CU Boulder research, those birds who are exposed to constant noise from oil and gas operations, suffer from chronic stress.

There is a high association between the noise pollution from oil and glass drilling and the chance of birds showing physiological signs of chronic stress.


A study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), discovered that western bluebirds which tend to move toward noisy surroundings drop fewer eggs that hatch. Birds exposed to noise pollution have fewer chicks than expected. The researchers found that chronic stress hampers bird’s reproducing capability.

Lead author of the study, Nathan Kleist at the CU Boulder conducted out an intensive and rigorous study and their results showed that noise pollution linked to both stress hormones and fitness of birds. For the research findings they took species of cavity-nesting birds which includes the western bluebirds, the mountain bluebirds, and the ash-throated flycatchers. The researchers found that as the birds are exposed to the excessive noisy environment, a key stress hormone called corticosterone get notably reduced.

“Noise is causing birds to be in a situation where they’re chronically stressed and that has really huge health consequences for birds and their offspring,” said Rob Guralnick, associate curator of biodiversity informatics at the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Through this new study, the researchers have made it clear that the noisy environment created by human activities is very harmful to wildlife.

Through the study, the scientists have made it clear that the noise pollution caused by human activities is very harmful to wildlife.