Antarctica’s Ice Levels Dropped to Record Low: Experts Didn’t Find Link with Climate Change

According to a researcher from the Antarctic Climate and Ecosystems Cooperative Research Center, Dr Jan Lieser, the Antarctic sea ice levels have been facing an enormous increase in the variability since past few years.

It is reported that the Antarctic sea ice has shrunk to around 2 million square kilometers since last three year. The record says a large maximum area has been covered to a record low, which can be the implications for the global climate.

Jan Lieser said that now the sea ice around Antarctica is appears like it has peaked up the sea at around 18.013 million square kilometers, which is the smallest maximum extent since more than 30 years by the readings of satellite.

There is a week-long meeting holding in Hobart, Tasmania by more than 60 scientists and meteorologists from across the world to better understand the changes in sea ice levels on frozen continent.

Lieser is one of those more than 60 scientists and meteorologists participated in the meeting held in Hobart for the discussion on the Antarctic sea ice levels also including a study on how it will affect the ship traffic.

Jan Lieser said in statement that, “More warmth into the system reduces the sea ice cover but there are also other mechanisms. Increased warmth increases the melt underneath shelves – that increases the fresh water balance of the ocean. Fresh water more readily freezes at the surface, which increases the sea ice again. We have seen a number of private and commercial ships becoming stuck in the Antarctic sea ice in recent years, which have led to costly rescue operations that can delay scientific work.”

 

 

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