Almost Half of Cancer Deaths in the US are Associated with Preventable Risk Factors Caused by Modern Lifestyle

A recent research shows that nearly half of the cancer deaths occur in the United States are triggered by potentially preventable risk factors, among which drinking, Smoking and excessive weight gain remain on the top.

The research has been published in CA, which is a peer reviewed Cancer Journal for Clinicians, which focused on highlighting the number of cancer diagnoses and deaths attributed to changeable or preventable factors.

Researchers belonged to the study have estimated a specific number of overall cancer reports and deaths for 26 sorts of cancer commonly found  adults from an age group of more than 30 years old in the United States assigned to a modifiable exposures. The major risk factors also include highly consuming processed meat and red meat, low consumption of veggies and fruits, physical inactivity, second hand smoke and alcohol intake.

Data obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), applied by the researchers to find that an estimated 42 per cent of cancer cases and 45.1 per cent of cancer deaths can be linked to these exposures.

ScD, Professor Elizabeth A. Platz from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health said that, “The study is an incredibly important piece of research because it is relevant to understanding cancer risk factors. I am very excited about the paper. It furthers the point that primary prevention is the future. It would be better for everyone to prevent cancer upfront.”

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